Human Cloning Ethical Issues Essay

Is Human Cloning Ethical? Essay

Is Human Cloning Ethical?Human cloning is a very controversial topic since it affects the moral values of human beings and other living things alike. In 1997, scientists announced the birth of the first cloned sheep, which they named Dolly. This signaled the future of cloning possibilities. Scientists began extensive experiments on cloning and, since then, they have cloned both plants and animals successfully (Williams, Johnson 3). The next step was to clone actual human beings; but before experiments could have been carried out pressure started to build on the scientists because people started to doubt if cloning was ethical and morally correct. Governments began to introduce bans and constraints on cloning, as they felt cloning was not correct, and because they had to represent the people of its country, it had to act on it. Surveys showed that the majority of people opposed human cloning because of the great likelihood of abuse. “The real problem is whenever man has shown master over man, it has always meant the enslavement of man”, Rabbi Moshe Tendler stated. It is perhaps for this reason that President Clinton and many other nations have outlawed government spending on human cloning (Simmons 4). Cloning has its pros but its cons seem to overcome them greatly. Human cloning is unethical and should not be legalized for many reasons. For one, cloning is expensive and there is only a slim chance of success. Secondly, human cloning would lead to emotional and psychological trauma for the cloned child, who would soon find out that he is just a replica of someone else. Finally, if human cloning is ever legalized and allowed to occur, it will ultimately sharply reduce genetic variability and the whole population will genetically all become the same (Lamb 1-3).

First of all, cloning is very expensive and, furthermore, there is a slim chance that it will work. In 1997, Dr. Ian Wilmut revealed to the world that he had cloned the first sheep which was named Dolly. Dolly, who soon became the world’s best known sheep, was cloned at Roslin, near Edinburgh (Rose 1). At this time, excitement grew into the desire to create human life (Simmons 1). Organ regeneration, advanced cosmetics, and the chance to have children were promised by scientists. After all, modern science created a sheep. Why can't it create a human? Well one reason is because it would take about 300 tries to produce a healthy baby. This is something the scientists did not clearly mention. What most people don't know is that Dolly was not the first. Ten of the 300 sheep were dead, five had deformities, and one could do nothing but pant (Williams, Johnson 3). It was destroyed because of the pain it was suffering. All of the rest of the attempted clones simply did not develop. How many times are we going to try to create a human? How many mentally handicapped and deformed babies will we bring...

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Animal and Human Cloning: Moral, Ethical, and Regulatory Issues

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"To Play or Not to Play... God?" This is a satirical essay that argues against using genetics to create human beings (through cloning, etc).

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Ethical Issues Of Human Cloning Essay

The word "cloning" is commonly used in everyday communication to mean many different technological procedures. Cloning is more specifically defined as somatic cell nuclear transfer. Simply explained by Glenn McGee in his article Primer on Ethics and Human Cloning as "the starvation and subsequent implantation of DNA from one organism (e.g., cells specialized to make that organism's hair or milk) into an egg whose DNA nucleus has been removed. The resulting egg and nucleus are shocked or chemically treated so that the egg begins to behave as though fertilization has occurred, resulting in the beginning of embryonic development of a second organism containing the entire genetic code of the first organism," (........).This method was first harnessed in 1952. Further manipulation of the procedure provided the first mammal being cloned in 1996. A sheep named Dolly was created by Dr. Ian Wilmut form PPL Therapeutics and the Roslin Institute of Edinburgh, Scotland. Several more mammals proceeded Dolly including mice, cows, pigs, cats, rabbits, and a mule in 2003. While progressing leaps and bounds, cloning still provided many undesirable presentations. For example, Dolly was severally obese and died prematurely. Aged chromosomes during her creation is thought to be the cause of her unfortunate death. Many clones created have had complications with their immune system, lung, livers and like Dolly, many have been obese. Cloning has also proven to require nearly endless attempts to provide a full pregnancy resulting in a live mammal. In Dolly's case, she proceeded 277 failed pregnancies. Furthermore than physical complications, many other issues, both tangible and ethical, steadfastly accompany cloning.

Cloning, still being entirely experimental, is believed by some to be worthy of pursuit. In common and vain terms, human cloning could provide for the furthering of "perfect" people. For example, cloning all star athletes could make the perfect team to annihilate the competition at championship year after year. The devastated could once again hold their lost loved ones in their arms. On a more extreme level, an army of unstoppably strong, fierce, and firm clone soldiers could be created to fight and secure our freedom. As appealing as this sounds, there are unwavering qualities that shatter this reverie. A clone is nothing more than an exact copy of the original being's genes. And genes determine nothing more than appearance and make up. Moreover, genes do not determine us as humans entirely. Our raising, environment, experience, trials and errors, mold us into the psychological unique beings that we are. This fact stands true in both humans and animals. A tangible example of already existing evidence lies in those of identical twins. Both have the same DNA yet it becomes apparent as the twins develop that they remain very different in personality. Since twins are raised mostly together in the same environment with the same discipline and still grow...

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Human Cloning is an Ethical Nightmare

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