Sd52 Prms Homework

Policies, Regulations and Forms


1 | Procedural Bylaw

A.  MEETINGS

  1. GENERAL
    • The quorum for a meeting of the Board shall be a majority of Trustees holding office at that time.
    • A Trustee may participate in a meeting by telephone or videoconference if the Trustee is unable to be physically present at the meeting.
    • A Trustee who participates in a meeting by telephone or videoconference shall be deemed present at the meeting and shall be counted for the purposes of determining quorum and voting.
    • If a Trustee participates in a meeting by telephone or videoconference, there shall be apparatus at the site of the meeting, which permits the Trustee participating by telephone or videoconference to hear all discussion by all Trustees and permits all Trustees to hear all comments by the Trustee participating by telephone or videoconference.
    • Meetings of the Board will be held at the School Board Office unless the Chairperson gives notice on the written notice of meeting and agenda or the Board otherwise resolves.
  2. INAUGURAL MEETINGS
    • The Board shall meet by the first Tuesday after the term of office begins at the same time as for a regular meeting. In the event that the inaugural meeting falls on the second Tuesday of the month, then the regular meeting shall be held on the third Tuesday of that month.
    • The interim Chairperson of the Inaugural meeting shall be the Secretary-Treasurer until such time as the Board Chairperson has been elected.
    • The interim Chairperson shall announce the results of Trustee elections and confirm that elected Trustees have completed the Declaration and Oath of Allegiance as required by the School Act, following which the Board Chairperson shall be elected.
    • The interim Chairperson shall call for nominations for Board Chairperson and conduct a vote by ballot in which that person receiving a clear majority shall be elected Board Chairperson. If no person receives a clear majority, further ballots shall be taken until the same is achieved or, if a tie shall occur, the election shall be decided by drawing of lots.
    • Following the election of Board Chairperson, the newly elected Board Chairperson shall assume the chair and the order of business shall be:
      1. Election of Vice-Chairperson;
      2. Election or appointment of BCPSEA Representative and Alternate; and
      3. Election or appointment of BCSTA Representative and Alternate.
    • The election of Vice-Chairperson shall be conducted in the same manner as the election of Chairperson.
    • If the BCPSEA Representative and Alternate and the BCSTA Representative and Alternate are elected, the election shall be conducted in the same manner as the election of Chairperson.
    • The Board Chair may choose to assign Trustees to Committees and to Schools.
  3. REGULAR MEETINGS
    • A regular meeting shall be held at least once a month on the second Tuesday of the month at 7:00 p.m. in months that school is in session or upon such other day or at such other hour as the Board may decide. Additional meetings shall be held as the Board may decide.
    • At the appointed time for commencement of a meeting the presiding officer shall ascertain that a quorum is present before proceeding to the business of the meeting. If a quorum has not been made within one-half hour after the appointed time, the meeting shall stand adjourned until the next regular meeting date or until another meeting shall have been called in accordance with these bylaws.
    • After a meeting has commenced, if notice is drawn to a lack of quorum, the presiding officer shall ascertain whether there is a lack of quorum and, if so found, adjourn the meeting to a time certain or to the next regular meeting date, at his/her discretion.
    • The order of business at all regular meetings, unless varied by motion, shall be as follows:
      1. Adoption of Agenda;
      2. Receiving Delegations;
      3. Approval of Minutes of Prior Meetings;
      4. Necessity of Closed Meeting and Agenda if Required;
      5. Correspondence;
      6. Superintendent of School's Report;
      7. Secretary Treasurer’s Report;
      8. Reports of Committees;
      9. Adjourned Business;
      10. New Business;
      11. Information Items; and
      12. 10 Minute Question & Answer Period.
    • A change to the prescribed order of business may be proposed by a Trustee and shall require unanimous consent, without debate.
    • The agenda and notice of meetings shall be prepared by the Secretary-Treasurer under the direction of the Chairperson. Written notice of each meeting, together with the proposed agenda, must be given to each Trustee at least 48 hours in advance by email.
    • Minutes shall be kept by the Secretary-Treasurer of the Board of all proceedings passed at meetings of the Board, such minutes to be concise and to detail proceedings of the Board, but not the contents of speeches.
    • All meetings shall stand adjourned at three hours after their commencement unless a resolution is passed by a two-thirds majority to extend the hour of adjournment.
    • All meetings of the Board shall be open to the public and no person shall be excluded, except for improper conduct. If, in the opinion of the Board, the public interest so requires, the Board may, by resolution, order a meeting or part thereof to be closed. The Board may exclude persons other than Trustees or persons other than Trustees and officers.
    • Requests for third party petitions and delegations must:
      1. be received in writing by the Secretary-Treasurer by the Friday which is 11 days prior to the board meeting;
      2. be relevant to the mandate of the school district;
      3. provide a summary of the matter to be presented;
      4. be approved for presentation to the board at the discretion of the Board Chair;
      5. designate who the speaker or speakers are to be (maximum of two); and
      6. not be in relation to matters that are the subject of labour negotiations; the subject of contractual negotiations or service agreements; or in relation to a specific client, employee, volunteer or student. At the discretion of the Board Chair, a presentation on such matters may be heard at an In-Camera meeting of the Board;

Petitions and delegations are limited to a maximum of 10 minutes. The Board reserves the right to limit the number of delegations to appear at a particular meeting. The Board will not normally receive more than one presentation from a particular person or group on the same or a similar topic in a six month period.

The Board's decision on the course of action to be followed in connection with the matter or matters presented will usually be delayed to a subsequent regular meeting.

  • Presentations should:
    1. be arranged at the invitation of the Superintendent of Schools;
    2. highlight successful initiatives in the school district; and
    3. be limited to a maximum of 10 minutes.
  • Questions in the 10 Minute Question and Answer period must pertain to items on the agenda for the meeting.
  • The presiding officer may expel and exclude from a Board meeting any person whom the presiding officer considers has been guilty of improper conduct.

 

    4.  SPECIAL MEETINGS

  • A special meeting of the Board may be called by the Chairperson or, upon written request of a majority of the Trustees, may be called by the Secretary-Treasurer. No business other than that for which the meeting was called shall be conducted at the meeting.
  • Written notice of a special meeting and an agenda shall be given to each Trustee at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting by email. Delivery of a written notice and the agenda may be waived by a majority vote of the Board, provided reasonable steps have been taken to notify all Trustees of the meeting.

    5.  CLOSED SESSION

  • Pursuant to paragraph A.3.i, the Board may convene a meeting without the public, or without the public and officers present, at which matters of a confidential nature shall be discussed. No Trustee shall disclose to the public the proceedings of a closed meeting unless a resolution has been passed at the closed meeting to allow disclosure.
  • Minutes of a closed meeting shall be kept in the same manner as a regular meeting but shall be approved only by the Board in closed meetings and shall not be filed with the minutes of regular meetings.
  • Pursuant to the School Act, a record of each closed meeting shall be kept available at all reasonable times for any person. The record shall contain a general statement as to the nature of the matters discussed and the general nature of the decisions reached.
  • Unless otherwise determined by the Board, the following matters shall be considered in closed session:
    1. Salary claims;
    2. Accident claims and other matters where Board liability may arise;
    3. Legal opinions respecting the liability or interest of the Board;
    4. The conduct, efficiency, discipline, suspension, termination or retirement of employees;
    5. Medical reports, including reports from the School Medical Officer;
    6. Matters pertaining to individual students including the conduct, discipline, suspension or expulsion of students, truancy and indigent students;
    7. Staff changes including appointments, transfers, resignations, promotions and demotions;
    8. Purchase of real properly including the designation of new sites, consideration of appraisal reports, consideration of accounts claimed by owners, determination of Board offers and expropriation procedures;
    9. Lease, sale or exchange of real property prior to finalization thereof;
    10. Matters pertaining to the safety, security or protection of Board property; and
    11. Such other matters where the Board decides that the public interest so requires.
  • All other matters shall be considered in Public Session.
  • The agenda of each closed session shall have as an order of business "items for release".

 

B.   CHAIRPERSON AND PRESIDING OFFICERS

  1. GENERAL
    • The Chairperson shall preside at all meetings of the Board but may vacate the Chair in order to propose or second a motion.
    • The Vice-Chairperson shall preside in the absence of the Chairperson or when the Chairperson vacates the Chair.
    • In the event that neither the Chairperson nor the Vice-Chairperson is able or willing to take the Chair, the presiding officer shall be such person as the Board may elect.
    • The Chairperson and the Vice-Chairperson shall be elected in December 2017 and for a term of one year in November of each subsequent year, unless otherwise changed. The election shall follow the process outlined in Section A.2 – Inaugural Meetings.
    • The presiding officer shall rule on all points of order and shall state the reasons and the authority for ruling when making a ruling. The presiding officer's ruling shall be subject to appeal to the Board. An appeal may only be requested immediately after a ruling and before resumption of business.
    • The Chairperson shall vote in accordance with paragraph F.1.d.
    • The Chairperson normally acts as spokesperson for the Board to the media, community and schools.

C.    RULES OF ORDER

  1. GENERAL
    • The application of the rules of order will be as follows:
      1. Where these rules are silent and where not inconsistent with these rules, Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised shall apply to the conduct of meetings;
      2. Where both these rules and Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised are silent, the Standing Orders of the British Columbia Legislature shall be followed; and
      3. Where there is an inconsistency between these rules and the School Act, the School Act shall apply over the rule in question.
    • The Board may adopt a procedural rule for one or more meetings by resolution of a majority of two-thirds of the Trustees present at the meeting.
    • The rules may be amended by bylaw only, at a meeting of which notice of intention to propose the amendment has been given at the previous meeting.
    • The presiding officer's ruling on a point of order shall be based on rules of order as stated in paragraph C.1.a herein.
    • An appeal of a ruling of the presiding officer shall be decided without debate by a majority vote of Trustees present. When an appeal is successful it does not set a precedent.
    • All questions shall be decided by a vote on the motion.

D. MOTIONS

  1. GENERAL
    • Motions shall be phrased in a clear and concise manner so as to express an opinion or achieve a result. A preamble does not form part of a resolution when passed.
    • The presiding officer may divide a motion containing more than one subject if the presiding officer feels this would produce a fairer or clearer result and the same shall be voted on in the form in which it is divided.
    • No motion other than to postpone consideration of a question, or a procedural motion, shall be repeated during the calendar year except by the reconsideration process.
    • All motions shall be seconded except in Committee.
    • All motions are debatable except the following:
      1. Motion for adjournment of debate or for adjournment of a meeting unless such a motion contains a time for recommencement of debate or for a new meeting;
      2. Motion to fix time for adjournment of a meeting;
      3. Motion to proceed to the next meeting;
      4. Motion to go into Committee of the Whole or closed session;
      5. Motion to table;
      6. Motion to recess;
      7. Motion to suspend rules;
      8. Motion to lift from the table; and
      9. Motion to move the previous question.
    • All motions shall be subject to amendment except the following:
      1. Motion that the question be now put;
      2. Motion for adjournment of debate or adjournment of a meeting;
      3. Motion to table unless such a motion contains a date for further consideration of the matter tabled;
      4. Motion to refer to Committee;
      5. Motion to proceed to next business;
      6. Motion to lift off the table;
      7. Motion to reconsider;
      8. Motion to postpone indefinitely; and
      9. Motion to suspend the rules.
    • An amendment to a motion does not require notice. Only one amendment to an amendment shall be allowed and the same shall be dealt with before the amendment is decided. Amendments must be strictly relevant to the main motion and not alter in a material way or be contrary to the principle embodied in the main motion.
  2. RECONSIDERATION
    • A question may be reconsidered only if notice of a request for reconsideration has been given at the previous meeting and if reconsideration is approved by a 2/3 majority.

E. DEBATE

  1. GENERAL
    • Debate shall be strictly relevant to the question before the meeting and the presiding officer shall warn speakers who violate this rule.
    • No Trustee or staff member shall speak until recognized by the presiding officer.
    • No person shall speak more than once to a question except the mover of a motion, who shall have the right to make a reply when all other Trustees who wish to speak have spoken. No Trustee shall speak for a period in excess of five minutes at one time. The presiding officer may caution a Trustee who persists in tedious and repetitious debate and may direct the Trustee to discontinue.
    • A matter of privilege (a matter dealing with the rights or interests of the Board as a whole or of a Trustee personally) may be raised at any time and shall be dealt with forthwith before resumption of business.
    • No Trustee shall interrupt another Trustee who has the floor except to raise a point of order or a point of privilege.

F. VOTING

  1. GENERAL
    • All Trustees present at a meeting must vote although a Trustee must abstain from voting in the event that he has a conflict of interest by reason of having a direct pecuniary interest in a vote.
    • A Trustee may also abstain from voting if reasons are stated.
    • Voting shall be by a show of hands and only the results recorded unless a Trustee requests recording of names. Where names are recorded both positive and negative votes shall be recorded.
    • The Chairperson shall vote at the same time as the other members of the Board and, in the case of equality of votes for and against a motion, the question is resolved in the negative and the Chairperson shall so declare.
    • All questions shall be decided by a majority of the votes of the Trustees present and voting save as otherwise provided by these bylaws or the School Act.

G. COMMITTEES

  1. GENERAL
    • The Chairperson shall appoint the members to each standing Committee at the first regular meeting in each year, or as soon thereafter as possible.
    • There shall be the following standing Committees:
      1. Framework for Enhancing Student Learning Committee;
      2. Policy Committee;
      3. Finance & Building Committee; and
      4. Personnel Committee.
    • Trustees attending meetings of a Committee are allowed to take part in any discussion or debate, but may not vote.
    • The rules applying in regular or special meetings shall be observed in Committee of the Whole and in standing Committees so far as they may be applicable, except as to the requirement for seconding of motions and limiting the number of times of speaking. Speeches in Committee of the Whole or standing Committees must be strictly relevant to the item or clause under consideration.
    • The actions of a Committee shall not be complete until its report has been approved by the Board.
    • The proceedings of a Committee will be reported to the Board by means of minutes of committee meetings. Minutes of the Finance & Building Committee and of the Personnel Committee will be presented to the Board at a closed meeting.
  2. Scope of Committees
    • Framework for Enhancing Student Learning Committee
      1. Membership:

        The committee will include the following positions:

  1. Two Trustees;
  2. Superintendent of Schools;
  3. Assistant Superintendent or Director of Instruction;
  4. District Principal, Learning Services;
  5. District Principal, Aboriginal Education;
  6. PRPA Representatives;
  7. PRDTU Representatives;
  8. IUOE Representatives;
  9. DPAC Representatives; and
  10. Student Representatives.

      The Assistant Superintendent or Director of Instruction, or delegate, will Chair the meetings of the committee.
      Other Trustees and staff may be in attendance.

  1. Scope of Committee

       The main responsibility of the committee is to prepare recommendations for the School Board’s approval in the following areas:

  1. Establishing the District’s Framework for Enhancing Student Learning; and
  2. Reviewing progress on the District’s Framework for Enhancing Student Learning.
  3. Recommendations

      Recommendations will be made by Trustee consensus. When consensus is not reached, Trustees may bring alternate recommendations to the Board.

  1. Meeting Schedule

      The Committee will meet on an “ad hoc” basis.

  1. Policy Committee

                 The Committee will comprise of the following individuals:

  • Two Trustees;
  • Superintendent of Schools; and
  • Secretary-Treasurer.

A Trustee will Chair the meetings of the Committee.

Other Trustees and staff may be in attendance.

  1. Recommendations
    Recommendations will be made by Trustee consensus. When consensus is not reached, Trustees may bring alternate recommendations to the Board.
  2. Scope of Committee:
    The main responsibility of the committee is to prepare recommendations for the School Board’s approval in the following areas:
  3. Review all Policies and By-Laws regularly;
  4. Review all proposed new Policies and By-Laws; and
  5. Monitor the consultation process for the review of Policies and By-Laws.
  6. Meeting Schedule

The Committee will meet prior to each scheduled Board meeting.

  1. Finance and Building Committee
    • Membership:
      1. Three Trustees;
      2. Superintendent of Schools; and,
      3. Secretary Treasurer.

Other Trustees and staff may be in attendance.

  1. Recommendations
    Recommendations will be made by Trustee consensus. When consensus is not reached, Trustees may bring alternate recommendations to the Board.
  2. Scope of Committee:
    The main responsibility of the committee is to prepare recommendations for the School Board’s approval in the following areas:
  3. Seismic Capital Plan;
  4. Capital Plan;
  5. Annual Capital Grant Expenditures in excess of $50,000;
  6. Audited Financial Statements;
  7. Joint Use Agreements with External Groups; and,
  8. Repurposing of School Buildings.

The committee will also serve as the Audit Committee for the School District.

  • Audit Committee Oversight

The Finance & Building Committee shall serve as the Audit Committee for the School District. The Audit Committee’s principle function is to oversee the school district’s financial reporting process and its internal control structure, and report its findings to the Board. This task is facilitated by:

  1. asking questions about the quality of work done by management;
  2. participating in the audit planning and reporting process; and
  3. understanding and reviewing the aspects of the operation that put the school district at risk and the district’s preparedness to face that risk.

The Audit Committee summarizes its findings and recommendations so that the School Board can make informed decisions.

  1. Audit Committee Function

The Committee shall:

  1. Review the audited financial statements and recommend approval of the audited statements by the Board;
  2. Oversee the internal control structure with a focus on safeguarding district assets;
  3. Review audit results with the external auditors and follow up on the implementation of the auditor’s letter of recommendations;
  4. Review the nature and extent of other services provided by the external auditors in relation to auditor independence;
  5. Monitor the development of, and changes to, accounting principles and practices and financial reporting standards and their impact on the school district’s financial reporting;
  6. Oversee engagement of external auditors including the terms of the audit engagement and the appropriateness of proposed fees; and
  7. Meet with the external auditors at an Audit Committee meeting without staff members present for a portion of the meeting to obtain independent feedback from the external auditors to Trustees.
  8. Meeting Schedule

The Committee will meet monthly prior to each scheduled Board meeting.

  1. Personnel Committee

       The Committee will comprise of the following individuals:

  1. Chair of the Board;
  2. Vice Chair of the Board;
  3. Superintendent of Schools; and
  4. Secretary-Treasurer.

The Director, Human Resources may be invited to attend a meeting of the committee.

The Chair of the Board will Chair the meetings of the Committee.

  1. Recommendations

Recommendations will be made by Trustee consensus. When consensus is not reached, Trustees may bring alternate recommendations to the Board.

  1. Scope of Committee:

The main responsibility of the committee is to prepare recommendations for the School Board’s approval in the following areas:

  1. Annual goal setting for the Superintendent;
  2. Annual performance evaluation for the Superintendent;
  3. Review of succession planning for the district;
  4. Review of proposed changes to salary and benefit plans; and
  5. Recruitment process for vacancies in the positions of Superintendent and Secretary-Treasurer.
  6. Meeting Schedule

The Committee will meet on an “ad hoc” basis.

H. BYLAWS AND RESOLUTIONS

  1. GENERAL
    • All matters shall be dealt with by resolution or bylaw. A resolution shall have only one reading. A bylaw shall have three readings.
    • The following matter shall only be resolved by bylaw:
      1. Amendments to bylaws;
      2. The rules of procedure of the Board and rules relative to the organization of meetings of the Board;
      3. Regulation and control of the use of property owned and administered by the Board; and
      4. Where otherwise required by the School Act.
  2. PROCEDURE ON BYLAWS
    • Before a bylaw is passed, a bylaw of the Board must be given three distinct readings.
    • Subject to subsection H.2.c, at each of the readings of a bylaw, the bylaw must be read in full.
    • A reading of a bylaw may, if a written or printed copy of a bylaw is in the possession of each Trustee and is available to each member of the public in attendance at the meeting at which the bylaw is to be read, consist of a description of the bylaw by:
      1. its title; and
      2. a summary of its contents.
    • The Board shall not give a bylaw more than two readings at any one meeting unless the members of the Board who are present at the meeting unanimously agree to give the bylaw all three readings at that meeting.

1110 | Learning Resources Policy

In accordance with the School Act and the Ministry of Education Learning Resources Policy, the Board of Education “may only use learning resources that the board considers appropriate, are specified in an educational program guide or are recommended by the Ministry of Education from time to time.”  The purpose of this policy and the accompanying regulations is to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the Board of Education regarding the selection of learning resources.

 The Board supports resource-based learning and encourages teachers to utilize a range of educational media and resources.  For the purpose of this statement of policy, the term “learning resources” will refer to any person(s) or any material with instructional content or function that is used for formal or informal teaching/learning purposes.

 The Board acknowledges that the primary objective of learning resources is to support, enrich, and help implement an educational program.  The Board delegates the responsibility for the selection and recommendation of learning resources to the Superintendent of Schools in accordance with district criteria.

 The Superintendent (or designate) and school principals have a general responsibility for ensuring that the approved criteria are known and appropriately applied. The responsibility for the vetting of recommended resources and subsequent purchase rests with school principals.

 Finally, on the basis of appropriateness, any student, parent or employee of the school district may formally challenge learning resources used in the district’s educational programs.

 

 

Related Policies and Regulations:

See Ministerial Order 333/99, the Educational Program Guide Order; section 5.

School Act, Section 168 (2) (e)

Ministry of Education Policy, Learning Resources Policy Statement, July 1, 2017

 

1110-10 Learning Resource Regulation

1110-30 Review of Instructional Materials Regulation

1115-10 Board Authorized Courses Regulation

 

OTHER

BC ERAC, Evaluating, Selecting and Acquiring

Learning Resources: A Guide https://www.bcerac.ca/resources/whitepapers/docs/ERAC_WB.pdf, 2008


1110-10 | Learning Resources Regulation

This Regulation provides criteria for the purchase of learning resources necessary to meet the educational needs of all students in the schools of the district. The responsibility for ensuring the criteria for learning resources selection is known and appropriately applied rests with the Superintendent and Principals.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF LEARNING RESOURCES

I.     PREAMBLE

“The ministry no longer conducts evaluation processes to recommended learning resources. This responsibility now rests with boards.”  Learning Resources Policy, July 2017

 

II.    Learning Resources Defined

For the purposes of this Regulation, the term "learning resources" will refer to any person(s) or material(s) (whether acquired or locally produced) with instructional content/function or opportunities that are used for formal or informal teaching/learning purposes. Learning resources include:

  • hands on learning tools like manipulatives
  • electronic media (e.g. computer software and programs, websites, movies and other multi-media)
  • library resources
  • guest speakers and presenters
  • field trips
  • print materials (e.g. textbooks, printed teaching materials)
  • other teaching resources chosen to support student learning

The primary objective of learning resources is to support, enrich, and help implement an education program.

 

III.  RESPONSIBILITY FOR SELECTION OF LEARNING RESOURCES

It is the duty of professional staff to provide students with a wide range of materials at varying levels of difficulty, with diversity of appeal and the presentation of different points of view.  Professional staffs are responsible for the selection of learning resources.

While selection of learning resources involves many people, the responsibility of coordinating recommended resources and subsequent purchase rests with school principals.

From time to time Sub Committees of District Committees (e.g. Framework for Enhancing Student Learning and the Aboriginal Education Committee) will be struck, for resource selection, for the reasons such as:

  • Uniformity of the main resources used within the district to accommodate the transitory nature of many of the students in Prince Rupert.
  • To ensure consistent programs throughout the district.
  • To ensure that schools with small staffs are not required to be responsible for several resource selections in one year.

 

IV.  CRITERIA ON THE SELECTION OF LEARNING RESOURCES

The School District supports learning resources that will:

  1. Support the learning standards of the BC curriculum (KUD – Knowledge, Understanding and Doing) or locally developed curricula;
  2. Support diverse learning needs;
  3. Help students apply what they learn in school to real life;
  4. Be developmentally and age appropriate and accommodate a variety of learning styles;
  5. Take into consideration students' varied interests, abilities and backgrounds ;
  6. Meet the requirements set by copyright considerations;
  7. Comply with the requirements set by FOIPPA;
  8. Be suitable based on social considerations such as, but not limited to: Aboriginal learning, gender identity and expression, multiculturalism, religion, and ethical standards;
  9. Place principle above personal opinion and reason above prejudice in order to assure a comprehensive, high quality collection of learning resources appropriate to the school community;
  10. Meet high standards of quality in factual content and presentation;
  11. Give priority to learning resources developed and produced in Canada, assuming the resource meets other criteria; and
  12. Meet present and future curricular needs of students, and are consistent with district and school directions.

V.   Other Considerations

  1. The selection of learning resources on controversial issues will be directed towards maintaining a balanced collection representing various views. Learning resources shall clarify historical and contemporary forces by presenting and analyzing intergroup tension and conflict objectively, placing emphasis on recognizing and understanding social and economic problems that led up to the conflict.
  2. Emphasis will be placed on the selection of Canadian learning resources and local learning resources (i.e. Aboriginal content) where appropriate. These resources include book and non-book learning materials by or about a Canadian person, region or event.
  3. Care should be taken to avoid duplication of learning resources already available in the school.
  4. Gift materials shall be judged by the criteria outlined and shall be accepted or rejected by those criteria.
  5. Selection is an ongoing process which should include the removal of materials which are no longer appropriate according to the criteria for the selection of learning resources.

 

REFERENCES:

See Ministerial Order 333/99, the Educational Program Guide Order; section 5.

School Act, Section 168 (2) (e)

Ministry of Education Policy, Learning Resources Policy Statement, July 1, 2017

1110 Learning Resources Policy

1110-30 Review of Instructional Materials Regulation

1115-10 Board Authorized Courses Regulation

 

OTHER

 BC ERAC, Evaluating, Selecting and Acquiring, Learning Resources: A Guide https://www.bcerac.ca/resources/whitepapers/docs/ERAC_WB.pdf, 2008


1110-20A | Request for Approval to Purchase a Class Set of Learning Resources - Form **Under Review**


1110-30 | Review of Instructional Materials

In the event that an individual, or group, objects to the use of a particular learning resource in a school, the following procedure will be followed:

a)   The Administrative Officer of the school concerned will arrange to discuss the objection with the complainant, and the librarian and/or the teacher concerned.

b)   If the above discussion does not satisfy the complainant, the Administrative Officer will provide the complainant with a Request for Review of Instructional Materials form, instruct the complainant to complete the form and submit it to the Superintendent of Schools.

c)   The Superintendent of Schools will appoint a review committee consisting of an administrator, a school librarian, two teachers, a member of the public-at-large and a trustee.

d)   The committee will examine and consider the learning resources being objected to on the basis of:

  • overall purpose
  • timelines of permanence
  • importance of the subject matter
  • quality of the writing/production
  • authoritativeness
  • reputation and significance of the author 
  • format
  • appropriateness for age/grade level concerned
  • bias

e)   The committee will meet with all school personnel concerned with the objection and with the complainant to explain its findings.

f)   The recommendation of the committee will be forwarded to the Superintendent of Schools for submission to the Board of School Trustees.


1110-40A | Request for Review of Instructional Materials - Form


1115 | Board Authority Authorized Courses Policy

Formerly:  Locally Developed Courses

RATIONALE/PURPOSE
The Ministry of Education encourages Boards of Education to offer locally relevant courses to meet the needs of schools and their communities while providing choice and flexibility for students.

Therefore, the Board of Education of School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) encourages the development of Board Authority Authorized courses to meet the particular needs of our community and students. 

 

POLICY
Schools may offer locally developed courses in conformity with the School Act and Ministry Policy (Board/Authority Authorized Courses, January 2004), and Board /Authority Authorized Courses.

Prior approval of the Board of Education is required before the course may be offered to students.

The Board is required to submit a BAA Course Form for new courses to the Ministry.   The Board must retain the full BAA Framework for review by the Ministry when requested.

Boards are required to submit to the Ministry of Education the course name of each Board/Authority Authorized Course (BAA) they plan to offer in the following school year.  

 

REFERENCE:
School Act Section 85 (2) (i), 168 (2) (b)
Ministry Policy (Board/Authority Authorized Courses, January 2004 and Updated 2011)
Regulation 1115-10 – Board Authorized Courses Regulation


1115-10 | Board Authority Authorized Courses

Formerly: Locally Developed Courses

1.0 Definition:

1.1 “Board Authorized Courses (BAA) courses” are offered to respond to the unique local needs of the schools and their communities while providing choice and flexibility for students.  These courses demonstrate planning, organization and sound    pedagogy.  BAA courses are authorized according to requirements set by the Ministry of Education.
 

2.0 Courses Eligible for Board/Authority Authorization:

2.1 BAA courses may be used as all or part of the elective credits students need to fulfill graduation requirements. 

2.2 In response to local needs and students interests the Board may authorize a broad variety of BAA courses focused on subject areas not offered through Ministry-developed courses. 

2.3 The Board may design ESL courses whose primary language is not Standard English and who may therefore require English as a second (or additional) language support so they may successfully access the BC curriculum.  These courses should not be remedial or modified versions of Ministry-authorized courses.

2.4 Grade 11 level BAA courses may be used to fulfill the Fine Arts/Applied Skills graduation requirement if they meet the outcomes of the Ministry-developed Grade 11 Fine Arts or Applied Skills Resources Packages.  Grade 10 and 12 BAA courses in the Fine Arts/Applied Skills subject areas do NOT meet the Fine arts/Applied Skills requirement. 

2.5 BAA courses may be developed to meet the needs of students with special needs (not to be confused with modified or adapted courses).  They may be developed for a variety of subjects or purposes such as social-emotional learning, to promote independence, or to develop employability skills.

2.6 The (Environmental) Sustainability Course Content Framework (2010) includes modules that might be used individually or as an entire BAA course.  Modules can be adapted into existing BAA course such as in the areas of leadership, environmental studies, and global issues.  
 

3.0 Courses Not Eligible for Board/Authority Authorization

3.1 Courses with a significant overlap with current provincial curriculum

3.2 Modified courses

3.3 Remedial courses

3.4 Adapted courses

3.5 GED testing preparation courses
 

4.0 Criteria

4.1 The Ministry of Education requirements are listed in the document “Board/Authority Authorized Courses: Required Components” and include a Ministry-developed BAA Course Framework Template.

4.2 The requirements for BAA courses define the structure, components, and rigour of a course.  They consist of the following:

  • Course name
  • Grade level
  • Number of credits (maximum of 4)
  • Course synopsis
  • Rationale
  • Organizational structure appropriate to subject/topic
  • Learning outcomes that are assessable and observable and that can be understood by students and parents
  • Instructional component that clarifies the outcomes and provides a range of pedagogical opportunities
  • Assessment component that provides a range of both formative and summative assessment
  • Learning resources that support the learning outcomes
     

5.0 Approval Process

5.1 The Board requires that any presentation in support of a locally developed course be made through the Superintendent and that it include all requirements as outlined by the Ministry of Education “Board/Authority Authorized Courses Requirements and Procedures Guidebook” (Updated 2011 version).

5.2 Teacher(s) (either individually or in groups) who wish approval of a course of their own design shall use the following procedures:

   5.2.1 Discuss the concept of the proposed course with their school principal before proceeding with the application.

   5.2.2 Make a thorough assessment of the student needs the course would meet.  Consult counsellors and other subject teachers to determine the level of interest and need in the proposed course.  In specific and appropriate situations, it may be advisable to seek expertise from the general community (i.e. specialty courses).

   5.2.3 The course should be consistent with Provincial requirements and based upon current information on how students learn.

   5.2.4 Prepare and submit an overall outline of the proposed course using the BAA Course Application to the School Principal. 

   5.2.5 Include an itemized list of required equipment and facilities, together with a cost analysis and a description of any organizational changes.

5.3 The School Principal will review the proposed course, and will review proposed revisions with the teacher(s).

5.4 The Principal will submit copies of the proposed course to the Superintendent or designate.

5.5 If approved, the Superintendent or designate along with the School Principal and Teacher(s) will present the course to the Board for approval.  In order for the course to be offered in the following school year, Board approval must be obtained prior to April 1st.

5.6 If approved by the Board of Education, the course will be submitted to the Ministry of Education in order to verify that the new course is compliant with the requirements of Board Authorized Course Ministerial Order.

5.7 It is the responsibility of the School Principal to ensure that any instructional material for use with individual students is consistent with and supportive of the objective of locally and provincially approved curricula.

5.8 Each BAA course will be evaluated after its first year and every three years thereafter.  A brief written report is to be submitted to the Superintendent or designate.

 

References:

School Act Section 85 (2) (i), 168 (2) (b)

Ministry Policy (Board/Authority Authorized Courses, January 2004 and Updated 2011)

BAA Course Form: www.bced.gov.bc.ca/graduation/board authority courses.htm

Ministry Developed Courses: www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp/welcome.php.

Environmental Sustainability Courses: www.bced.gov.bc.ca/greenschools/sustcoursecontent.htm
 

Related Policies and Regulations:

Regulation 1115 – Board Authorized Courses Policy


1115-10A | Questionnaire - Form Approval of Locally Adapted or Locally Developed Course


1120 | French Immersion Policy

RATIONALE/PURPOSE

French Immersion programming provides the opportunity for students in the school district to become bilingual in both of Canada's official languages, English and French.

 

POLICY

The Board of Education believes that students should have the opportunity to receive instruction in the French language through French Immersion programs in elementary, middle, and secondary grades. The French Immersion program operates as an optional district operated and managed program. The French Immersion Program is not intended to be a selective program. It is in students' best interests that classes include students with a variety of aptitudes, cultures, and backgrounds. The Board believes that French Immersion instruction should be available to all students who desire to be enrolled in the program providing staffing requirements can be accommodated.

 

 

REFERENCES

School Act, section 5(3)
Ministry of Education Policy: French Immersion Program
Ministerial Order 333/99, Educational Program Guide Order
Ministerial Order 295/95, Required Areas of Study in an Educational Program
Ministerial Order 302/04, Graduation Program Order


1120-10 | French Immersion Regulation

In addition to provincially prescribed French courses, students in this school district have the opportunity of receiving instruction in French language, one of Canada's official languages, through French Immersion at the elementary, middle school and secondary levels. French Immersion operates as an optional District managed program.

The Provincial goal for French Immersion is to provide the opportunity for non-francophone students to become bilingual in English and French. The Early Immersion program provides students with an education equivalent to that which is available in the English language program, while providing students with the opportunity to acquire a high level of proficiency in French.

The School District will:

  1. Endeavour to maintain an Early French Immersion Program for students in Kindergarten through Intermediate within guidelines of the Ministry of Education, provided that there is adequate student enrollment in the program and that staffing requirements can be accommodated.
  2. Attempt to maintain a dual track, French/English system of school organization that emphasizes multiculturalism and coexistence.
  3. Attempt to provide the elementary immersion schooling (Kindergarten to grade 5) in the same facility.
  4. Provide French Immersion programming in secondary school subjects within guidelines recommended by the Ministry of Education, as facilities, financial resources, staff resources and school organization permit and provided that there is adequate student enrollment in the program.

ENTRY

The French Immersion Program is not intended to be a selective program and it is in the students' best interest that classes contain students with a variety of aptitudes, cultures and backgrounds. French Immersion instruction should be available to all students who desire to be enrolled in the program unless unavailability of appropriate staff would result in a detrimental learning environment. Therefore:

1.  Kindergarten shall be the normal entry point for students without previous French instruction.

2.  Any student may enrol in the Early French Immersion Program, if the entry point is appropriate.

3.  Entry into Early French Immersion at a higher level for a student without previous French instruction shall be determined by the Principal after consultation with and following a probationary agreement with the Early French Immersion teacher and the Principal of Early French Immersion.

4.  If enrolment in Kindergarten is such that the learning environment will deteriorate because an additional Kindergarten class would be required and cannot be offered due to unavailability of immersion staff, then enrollment should be limited to numbers that would permit an acceptable educational environment and students should be admitted in the following priority.

  • Students who have a sibling or siblings in the Early French Immersion Program.
  • Students who have a sibling or siblings attending the school in which the Early French Immersion Program is located.
  • Students who do not have a sibling in the Early French Immersion Program or in the school in which the program is located.

   The Superintendent, or designate, will adjudicate whenever the above criteria fails to produce a decision.

5.  Students transferring into School District No. 52 who are already enrolled in French Immersion Program elsewhere will be placed in the program subject to space and resources being available. Transfers out of the program will be made by the Principal in consultation with parents, teacher and counsellor agreeing that the transfer will solve a specific problem for that student.

6.  French Immersion students/programs will not displace students out of their neighbourhood school.

TRANSPORTATION

Transportation to and from the French Immersion school is the responsibility of the parent.

SUPPORT SERVICES

Support services such as Learning Assistance, Library and Gifted will be available to French Immersion students on an equitable basis with regular program students and, where possible, available in French and English.


1130 | Student Support Policy

RATIONALE

The Board of Education is committed to providing all students with an education program that best suits their needs and enables them to achieve their maximum potential in a safe, caring and welcoming environment. The Board supports an inclusive education system in which all students are fully participating members in a community of learners.

POLICY

The Board believes that the unique needs of individuals and the challenges of a small, remote school district should be taken into account when providing support services to students. The Board supports engaging, inclusive and culturally relevant education for all students within the Response to Instruction and the Universal Instructional Design Frameworks. Where additional services and support for students are needed, decisions are made in consultation with parents, students (when appropriate) and members of the community based team.

Culturally relevant programs and services provide the foundation for healthy students and communities. The Response to Instruction Framework incorporates a flexible continuum of school-wide strategies for all students, targeted supports for students with specific challenges, and intensive supports for students with persistent challenges.

The Universal Instructional Design Framework brings together many school district initiatives to provide multiple avenues of access to curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Services and support focus on multiple pathways to success and multiple ways of defining success.

Within the Response to Instruction and Universal Instructional Design Frameworks students receive maximum benefit from their education program, in accordance with the objectives of Provincial curricula, school district programs, and Board approved school programs.

 

References:

  • Ministry of Education Policy: Special Education
  • Ministry of Education Policy: K-12 Funding, Special Needs
  • Ministry Policy: Distributed Learning: Requirements and Guidelines for Students with Special Needs
  • School Act, Sections 75, 79(3), 85(2)(j), 88(1), 168(2)(t)
  • Ministerial Order M150/89, Amended M297/95; M32/04; M235/07: Special Needs Students Order
  • Ministerial Order 149/89: Support Services for Schools Order
  • Ministerial Order 191/94, amended most recently M197/11: Student Progress Report Order
  • Ministerial Order M638/95, amended most recently by M261: Individual Education Plan Order
  • Prince Rupert School District Response to Instruction (RTI) Framework
  • Universal Instructional Design Framework
  • 1130-10 – Delivery of Instructional Services to Students with Special Needs Regulation

1130-10 | Instructional Services to Students with Special Needs

The Board of School Trustees recognizes and accepts its obligation to provide an appropriate educational program to all children of school age.  In addition, the Board seeks to ensure that all students receive maximum benefit from their instructional program in that, as far as possible, the objectives of the provincial curriculum, district curriculum, and locally approved school programs, are achieved.

Where special services are required by students, decisions must be made as to means of delivering instruction.  Generally it is expected that the instructional program will be carried out in a regular instructional setting.  However, it is recognized that there may be times during the instructional day when a student will require a different instructional environment.

This instructional environment might include using such instructional arrangements as: grouping within the class or school, providing support from special education teachers, (e.g., learning support teachers), providing auxiliary services such as hospital homebound tuition, or enrolling the student in another district where an appropriate program is available.  Close consultation with all parents/guardians is deemed by the Board to be necessary, and particularly where special measures are required to provide an adequate education for the child.  (See Ministry of Education Order 150/89; amended by M397/95)

The factors affecting decisions regarding the delivery of educational services to students with special needs include:

  1. Needs of students.
  2. The means by which instruction can most effectively be provided.
  3. The availability of qualified teaching staff, appropriate facilities and materials, and suitable curriculum.
  4. The wishes of parents/guardians and students.
  5. The level of support available from other agencies such as Ministry of Children and Family Development, Health and the Attorney General's Department.

The Board's primary obligation is to provide an appropriate instructional program and, in attempting to do so, it will actively seek the cooperation and support of other agencies and groups who are able to provide non-educational services to students with special needs.
 

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES HANDBOOK

Prince Rupert School District No. 52 shall maintain a Learning Services Handbook on the district website.  The Handbook will outline referral procedures, placement process, assessment practices, screening committees, program descriptions and student records, consistent with the Special Education Services:  A Manual of Policies, Procedures and Guidelines.


1130-20 | Guidelines to Third Party Service for Students at Schools Regulation

  1. All third party service to students at schools requires the approval of the District Principal, Learning Services (DPLS) or the Superintendent of Schools.  Access will be provided via the building Principal, the District Principal of Learning Services (DPLS), or the Superintendent of Schools.
  2. A meeting with the Superintendent and/or District Principal of Learning Services will be held prior to engaging with students or staff to:
    • Determine the role and qualifications of any third party not directly employed by SD52 who provides service or consultation to students and families. 
    • Ensure there will be no duplication of services currently provided by:
      • IUOE
      • PRDTU
      • Other staff
      • Other established local or Provincial consultants
    • Ensure a protocol exists and is followed for:
      • Involvement in the School Based Team
        • The Learning Services Teacher (LST) is the case manager for students with exceptionalities.  The LST organizes SBT Meetings, takes minutes, invites attendees, etc.  Communication with the Learning Services Teacher is imperative.
  3. We recognize there may be secondary or incidental usefulness of information sharing which may be done only where permissions have been granted by parents/guardian.
  4. Third parties provide support to families not the school system – unless incidentally.
  5. A current criminal record check is required as per any volunteer.
  6. Regarding observations in schools:
    • Prior to observations or visits at the school:  
      • Any observations must be approved by the school principal and/or the DPLS
      • Any observations must be coordinated with the classroom teacher, LST, school principal, or the DPLS
    • Following observations or visits at the school:   
      • Any reports prepared must be shared with the LST, school principal or the DPLS
      • Reports must follow ethical and confidentiality guidelines
      • Third party agencies may not make recommendations to Education Assistants or Classroom Teachers; any proposed recommendations must be discussed with the LST, DPLS, or school principal, and the LST, DPLS and/or  school principal will determine whether or not to implement those recommendations
    • The third party provider must:
      • Sign in and out at the office as per district practice
      • Request permission to attend the school in advance and recognize that there may be times which are not convenient based on classroom or other school activities
      • Provide parent permissions for working with the child to the school principal
      • Recognize our primary responsibility is to the student and their family
      • Leave the site if asked
  7. Third parties are to familiarize themselves with and abide by school district policies (which can be found on the SD52 website) and regulations regarding (these can be found on the SD#52 website:
    • Restraint and safety
    • Emergency procedures (fire drill, earthquake, lockdown, and hold and secure etc.)
  8. Third party agencies must act without conflict of interest.
  9. Insurance shall be held by third parties (coverage for accident and liability, including WorkSafe BC coverage).

 

Related Policies and Regulations:

1130   Student Support Policy


1130-30 | Therapy Dogs - Instructional/Emotional Assistance to Students Regulation

The School District endeavours to provide appropriate educational assistance to meet the needs of all children of school age. In order to meet this obligation, the assistance of a therapy dog has been shown to be beneficial. A therapy dog is a canine that is trained to provide affection and comfort to people in hospitals, retirement homes, nursing homes, schools, hospices, disaster areas, and to people with autism. In the educational environment, normally the therapy dog is the pet of an educator. For the purposes of this regulation, therapy dogs are not guide dogs for the blind or service dogs. 

The presence of a therapy dog within a school or school board facility must have purpose. This purpose includes, but is not limited to building student confidence; providing emotional stability to a student; assisting a student to manage emotions; and instructing a student in empathy and caring for others.

An employee of School District 52 wishing to bring a therapy dog into any district school or facility shall, prior to bringing the dog into the facility:

  • Obtain the approval of the Principal or management designate to proceed with a plan of introduction of the therapy dog into the educational facility
  • Provide the Principal or management designate with proof of appropriate, completed training (for example, St. John’s Ambulance provides therapy dog training)
  • Advise other staff members including counsellors, teachers, secretaries, educational assistants and janitors of the possibility of the canine entering the school or facility to be aware of any concerns staff may have
  • Discuss the possibility of the canine entering the class with students to determine if allergies or fear of dogs is a factor within the class.  Students should also be encouraged to speak privately to the dog handler or send notes in case they do not wish to speak publicly about their fear

In the event a therapy dog enters a school, classroom or other district facility:

  • The dog will be controlled via leash at all times
  • Students may control the dog only in the presence of the handler

 

REFERENCES:

1130 – Student Support Policy

1130-10 – Instructional Services to Students with Special Needs Regulation

1810-10 – Animals in School Regulation


1140 | Student Reporting Policy

Student Reporting - Communicating Student Learning to Parents

The Board of Education recognizes that communication among students, parents, teachers and administrators fosters positive relations and encourages student academic and social growth. 

Further, the Board recognizes that there are many different ways of reporting to parents and encourages the use of non-traditional methods of reporting student progress and achievement that support the tenets of formative, growth based learning. These include, for example, the use of student portfolios (digital or otherwise), criterion referenced assessment outcomes, student-led conferences and demonstrations of learning through student projects.

The Board encourages school communities to examine, and propose alternate forms of K - 9 reporting that could potentially better demonstrate student growth over time than past reporting practices.   Proposed forms of reporting that enhance student awareness of his/her academic and social-emotional growth as well as more clearly communicate student improvement to parents are encouraged.  

 

References:

Ministerial Order 191/94, the Progress report Order

Ministerial Order 192/94, the Provincial Letter Grades Order

Ministerial Order 295/95, the Required Areas of Study Order

Regulation 265/89, the School regulation

1140-10 – Student Reporting Regulation


1140-10 | Student Reporting Regulation

Student Reporting - Communicating Student Learning to Parents

All new reporting formats must meet the guidelines of the Interim Student Reporting Order and Board approval which will take into consideration the following factors:

  • Frequency and timing of reporting
  • Format/Template
  • Comments only reporting
  • Enhanced communication of student learning in relation to the standards
  • Communication to the school community
  • Reports on all Required Areas of Study as per Ministerial Order 295/95

 

Teachers not utilizing a Board approved method of student reporting are expected to follow the revised Schedule B. Student Reporting Policy as prescribed by the Ministry of Education. (July 2016)  

All K – 9 reporting in the district must meet at minimum the following outlined requirements of the Ministry of Education:

  • Students will receive a written summative report that addresses student progress in relation to the learning standards at the end of the school year or semester and includes all Required Areas of Study as per Ministerial Order 295/95.
  • Summative reporting will also include student self-assessment of core competencies with teacher support as well as descriptions of progress in relation to learning standards for Applied Design, Skills and Technologies & Career Education.
  • Current Permanent Student Record requirements must be met.

Approved reporting pilots are required to submit templates and communication plans that will be posted on the district website.

As approved by the Board all Grade 4 & 5 students will receive summative reports using a Performance scale.  Parents who formally request letter grades will receive them as an attachment to the summative report.

 

References

Ministerial Order 191/94, the Progress report Order

Ministerial Order 192/94, the Provincial Letter Grades Order

Ministerial Order 295/95, the Required Areas of Study Order

Regulation 265/89, the School regulation

1140 – Student Reporting Policy


1140-20 | Work Study / Work Experience

  1. The Board authorizes the conduct of Work Study/Work Experience programs for students of 15 years of age or older in accordance with regulations and guidelines of the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Labour for such programs.
     
  2. The Board also authorizes Work Study programs for students under 15 years of age. Students under 15 years of age participating in a Work Study program are prohibited from participating in "Work" experience.
     
  3. The Superintendent of Schools may apply on behalf of the Board for Ministry of Education approval to conduct Work Experience programs.

1150-10 | Student Retention Regulation

Years of cumulative research has consistently demonstrated that the potential for negative effects consistently outweighs the potential for positive outcomes with respect to grade retention. Accordingly, educational practice has shifted to the almost exclusive use of promotion with intervention for those students who are at academic risk.  The new curriculum for Grade K-9, implemented in September 2016 is designed to support the inclusive classroom and the ideal of continuous learning.

In the Prince Rupert School District, promotion practices are expected to be in alignment with research findings: i.e. students will not normally “repeat” a program of studies in the primary or intermediate grades or otherwise be retained in a grade to join a younger age group.  Each school is expected to develop appropriate intervention strategies in support of this practice.

In highly unusual circumstances, exceptions may be made. In these exceptional instances, it is imperative that the decision to retain be made by the school-based team in consultation with district and/or Board Office staff. Prior to holding a school-based meeting or entering into any discussion with parents regarding retention, principals are expected to provide the Superintendent of Schools (or designate) with appropriate documentation regarding any student who is being considered for retention.

Where the school-based team does not recommend retention but the parent/guardian still desires this, the district will require informed and signed parental consent indicating that the parent/guardian is aware of current research on student retention.  Principals may share “Reporting Student Progress: Policy and Practice,” March 2009, p. 41 for a brief examination of concerns about retention.

Such a record of parental consent would clearly document why retention is desired by the parent.


1160-10 | Home Schooling

Parents have the right to home school a student as outlined in Sections 12 and 13 of the School Act.  Such students must be registered at a school of the parent’s choice.

The School District will provide services to registered home schooled students as outlined in Section 3 of the School Regulation.  Those services include:

  1. Evaluation and assessment of the student;
  2. Loan of educational resources materials; and
  3. Audit of school courses where space allows, upon payment of a fee.

Evaluation and assessment of the student may be arranged through the school principal.

Home school students may have access to educational resources through the school library. The Principal may set limitations to usage so as to ensure the availability of the resources for regular students. The School Principal has authority to set rules and expectations for home school students entering the school and using library resources.

Arrangement to audit a school course will be done with the school principal. The fee to audit a school course will be calculated as the fee charged to an international student pursuant to Regulation 1220-10 multiplied by the proportion of time for the course to the time of a full-time student.

REFERENCES:

School Act Sections 3, 12 and 13
School Regulation Section 3
1160-15 – Distributed Learning Regulation
1220-10  International and Non-Reciprocal Exchange Students - Admission and Tuition


1160-15 | Distributed Learning Regulation

Parents have the right to register a student in a distributed learning program as outlined in Sections 12 and 13 of the School Act. Distributed learning programs are offered by both public school districts and independent schools and allow students to pursue their education at home.

Students from Kindergarten to Grade 7 are considered to be full-time students in the distributed learning school. Such students may take a school course after the school Principal reaches an agreement with the principal of the distributed learning program to share the student’s funding.

Students from Grade 8 to Grade 12 can be cross-enrolled. The student may be registered in the district and take one or more courses from the distributed learning program. The student may also be registered in the distributed learning program and take one or more courses from the school district. Funding is provided for each course in which the student becomes active.

 

Related Policies and Regulations:

School Act Sections 3, 12 and 13
School Regulation Section 3
1160-10 – Home Schooling Regulation


1160-20 | Challenge

A. Preamble

Challenge is a tool that can assess students' prior learning and can allow them to obtain credit for a grade 10, 11 or 12 course.

Challenge is a rigorous process for students who provide compelling evidence of being exceptional in a subject area and who have a high likelihood of successfully meeting the learning outcomes of a course. It is anticipated that challenge will apply to only a small number of students.

Challenge is not envisioned as a way for students to improve their course marks, nor as a replacement for the valuable experience students gain by being in a classroom setting.

B.  Regulation

  1. All students may challenge courses for credit, subject to procedures established by the School Board.
  2. Students may challenge for credit grade 10, 11 and 12 Ministry developed or Board approved courses taught in the school district.
  3. For a challenge to be successful, students must demonstrate they have met the prescribed learning outcomes of a course.
  4. To successfully challenge for credit, students must meet the same standards as students who take the course through regular classes.
  5. Students will be awarded a letter grade and percentage mark for a course which has been successfully challenged.
  6. There is no limit to the number of grade 10, 11 and 12 courses that a student can challenge.
  7. Courses will be available for challenge one year after full implementation of the course.
  8. A challenge should begin no later than one quarter (10 weeks) prior to the commencement of the course being challenged.
  9. The Principal is responsible for implementation of the procedures.

C.  Eligibility

Challenge is not available in the following circumstances:

  • the student has already challenged the course and received a passing grade
  • the student has already completed the course through previous enrolment, or
  • the student has already been granted equivalency for the course.

Therefore the principal must first consider whether credit for the course can be granted through equivalency.

In order to be eligible to participate in the challenge process, a student must be enrolled in the School District.

Students arriving from other jurisdictions may challenge for credit where equivalency cannot be determined.

Students must demonstrate their readiness to challenge a specific course for credit. This should not be an onerous process. Indications of readiness will include:

  • recommendations from teachers based on previous learning;
  • evidence that relevant learning has been acquired outside of school; and
  • appropriateness of challenge to the student's education goals as set out in their Student Learning Plan.

The decision for readiness should be made by the school in consultation with the student and parents.

Students who qualify to participate in the challenge process may challenge for credit only grade 10, 11 or 12 courses. Students may challenge a course without being enrolled in grade 10, 11 or 12.

D.  Assessing and Evaluating the Challenge

The assessment and evaluation of a challenge should reflect the range and depth of the prescribed learning outcomes for the course and could include:

  1. hands-on demonstrations
  2. oral/aural performances
  3. portfolios or collections of work
  4. interviews
  5. written examinations
  6. reports, essays or other written forms of expression

The assessment and evaluation strategies should include more than a single activity and should involve a process over time.

Each department as required will develop a Challenge Framework for assessing and evaluating a student's ability to meet the prescribed learning outcomes.

The assessment and evaluation strategy should be established jointly by administrator, department head or designate, counsellor, challenge student and their parents. The final decision shall rest with the Principal.

The assessment and evaluation strategy must be completed at least two weeks prior to the first reporting period for the course.

Challenging Courses with Provincial Examinations

Students may challenge courses with a provincial examination according to the following procedures:

  • Students will first challenge the school portion of the course mark.
  • If the students are unsuccessful, they will be given an opportunity to write the provincial examination.
  • The school will submit the school mark derived from the challenge process before the provincial examination is written, as indicated in the Ministry's Handbook of Procedures.
  • Students will only write the provincial examination at the scheduled times set by the Ministry.
  • Students will be awarded credit and receive a letter grade and percentage mark according to Ministry Reporting Regulation and Guidelines and the Student Progress Report Order.

REFERENCES:

Ministry Policy - Earning Credit through Equivalency, Challenge, External Credentials, Post Secondary Credit and Independent Directed Studies

1160-30 – Equivalency for Credit Grade 11 and 12 Regulation


1160-30 | Equivalency for Credit Grade 11 and 12

Equivalency is the process of granting credit for a Grade 10, 11 or 12 Ministry developed or Board authorized course offered in the School District.

A.  Regulation

  1. Students registered at a secondary school in the School District, including home schooled students, are entitled to apply for an equivalency review of their credentials received from other educational jurisdictions.
  2. Equivalency credit will be available only for Grade 10, 11 and 12 courses.
  3. To qualify for an equivalency review, students must provide documentation to prove they have successfully completed a course.
  4. The School District will follow determinations about equivalency listed by the Ministry of Educationin the Handbook of Procedures for the Graduation Program or in the online Course Registry.
  5. Full equivalency credit will only be granted for credentials from other educational jurisdictions and institutions outside the regular school system which match at least 80% of the prescribed learning outcomes for Ministry developed or Board authorized courses.
  6. Partial equivalency may be granted for credentials which meet less than 80% of the prescribed learning outcomes of a Ministry developed or Board authorized course.
  7. There is no limit to the number of credits a student may be awarded through the equivalency process.
  8. Course credits which are received through equivalency will normally be assigned a letter grade and percentage, for transcript and reporting purposes. If the student's documents show only a letter grade or level, schools may choose to assign a percentage, based on the mid-point of the matching British Columbia letter grade range.
  9. "Transfer Standing" may be used if it is not possible to determine a letter grade and a percentage from the documentation.
  10. The principal will be responsible for implementing procedures for determining equivalency.
  11. If a student requests an Equivalency Review for a provincial course with credentials not listed in the Table of Equivalencies, the student must follow Prince Rupert School District No. 52 procedures for establishing equivalency.

B.  Ministry Recognized Equivalency

  1. In order to be eligible for an Equivalency Review students must provide a credential, document, diploma or certificate stating what course was completed and giving an evaluation of the student's performance, translated into English if necessary.
  2. After the student's credential is verified, provincial equivalency will be granted and credit value will be assigned in accordance with:
    • Selection and Challenge of Learning Resources (B.C. Ministry of Education, 1991).
    • Secondary Education in Canada: A Student Transfer Guide (Council of Ministers of Education of Canada, 1991).
    • The International Guide to Qualifications in Education (The National Academic Recognition Information Centre for the United Kingdom, Mansell Publishing Ltd.).
  3. The school counsellor, in consultation with the principal, is responsible for assigning a letter grade and percentage, or a transfer standing, to the learning.

C.  Procedures for Establishing Equivalency

  1. If the credential is not listed in the list of resources under C.2 then the following procedure will be followed:
    • The student will fill in an "Application for Equivalency" form.
    • The student will provide a credential, document, diploma or certificate stating what course was completed, an evaluation of the student's performance, and a copy of the course syllabus describing learning outcomes, translated into English if necessary.
    • The school counsellor, in consultation with the principal, will decide whether or not there is a match of at least 80% of the learning outcomes between the syllabus and the course for which full or partial equivalency is being sought.
    • The principal will contact the Director of Instruction or Assistant Superintendent, who will convene a District Review Panel consisting of at least one principal, one counsellor and one subject specialist to determine the credibility of the institution and the qualifications of the instructor, and to evaluate the criteria used to assess and evaluate student performance. Consultation with community resource people may need to occur.
    • The District Review Panel will recommend to the Superintendent of Schools whether or not equivalency should be granted and what credit value should be assigned.
    • Once equivalency is granted, this information should be communicated to schools under the title "School District 52's Table of Equivalencies".
    • The school counsellor, in consultation with the principal, is responsible for assigning a letter grade and a percentage, or a transfer standing, to the learning.
  2. Schools are responsible for establishing reasonable timelines for students to apply for equivalency.
  3. Schools are responsible for ensuring this Regulation and procedures are communicated to students and parents.
  4. If equivalency is not granted, students can apply to challenge the course.

REFERENCES:

Ministry Policy - Earning Credit through Equivalency, Challenge, External Credentials, Post Secondary Credit and Independent Directed Studies

1160-20 – Challenge Regulation


1160-40 | Independent Directed Study

Independent directed study allows students to earn extra credit at the grade 10, 11 or 12 level under the supervision of a teacher. Such study is intended to provide opportunity for in-depth study based on the learning outcomes of either Ministry developed or a Board authorized courses.

Independent directed study provides opportunities for greater flexibility in the education system by permitting students to pursue further studies of interest beyond those usually taught in the school course. This can take the form of:

  • extending the curriculum at a higher level;
  • addressing parts of the curriculum that have not been taught;
  • conducting an in-depth study of an aspect of the curriculum; or
  • doing more focused activities related to parts of the curriculum.

 

A.   Regulation

  1. Independent Directed Study is not a student entitlement. Students must demonstrate the ability to work independently before approval for independent directed study.
  2. The maximum value in one independent-directed study course is four credits.
  3. Credit earned through independent-directed study will be applied only to the elective requirements for graduation.
  4. The student and the supervising teacher are responsible for the development of the independent directed study plan.
  5. The Principal must approve the study plan prior to commencement of the independent directed study.

B.  Study Plan

Students are not required to be enrolled in, or have completed, the specific course in order to be considered for the opportunity to participate in an independent-directed study related to the course.

An independent-directed study must be principally based on the Learning Standards of the course.

Students will be involved in the design, planning and evaluation of their work. With the support of an educator each student will develop a plan for completing the independent-directed study. This will become part of the Student Learning Plan and include:

  • a process for ongoing facilitation and assessment of student progress;
  • a criteria for determining successful completion of the independent directed study; and
  • an agreed upon credit value (up to four credits) for the proposed independent directed study.

 

C.    Assigning and Reporting Independent-Directed Study

When a student has completed an independent-directed study, the results will be reported in the subsequent reporting period using a letter grade and a percentage and will show the associated credit(s).

The independent-directed study code will indicate the course on which it is based.

Students will receive provincial course credit when the independent-directed study is based on a Ministry developed course; students will receive local course credit when the independent-directed study is based on a Board approved course.

An independent-directed study based on curriculum will be recorded as a credit at the same grade level as the underlying course.

 

 

REFERENCES:

Ministry Policy - Earning Credit through Equivalency, Challenge, External Credentials, Post Secondary Credit and Independent Directed Studies


1170-10 | Copyright Regulation

The Board of School Trustees recognizes the existence of the Copyright Act (1988) designed to protect the rights of authors and producers of creative works. 

The Board requires its employees to respect copyright provisions as they pertain to all aspects of modern publishing, media and computer technology and the Board will not accept financial responsibility for any violations that are knowingly undertaken by its employees. 

Employees of School District No. 52 need to be instructed so that they do not violate the Copyright Act (1988) when performing their duties. Accordingly, Administrative Officers and supervisors should ensure their staff is familiar with the Regulations and guidelines. 

The Board requires teachers, when there are opportunities for copyright violations by students, to instruct students what the Copyright Act means and to attempt to supervise students in a manner that a copyright violation does not occur. 

The Superintendent shall create guidelines to instruct employees on what is or is not a violation of the Copyright Act. 

Copies of the guidelines shall be readily available to all employees. 

Applicable portions of the Copyright Act and guidelines will be attached to V.C.R.'s, computers, photocopiers and other appropriate duplicating equipment. 
 

COPYRIGHT GUIDELINES 

A. Computer Software 

  1. Unauthorized duplication of computer software is illegal and constitutes infringement of copyright according to both judicial precedent and the Copyright Act. 
  2. It is not legal for a teacher to make class sets of software without first obtaining authorization (e.g., site licences) from the copyright owner. 
  3. Owners of computer software may make one back-up copy and/or modify legally obtained computer software for their personal use. 
  4. Administrators are advised to investigate the overall computer software situation at their schools and formulate policies for dealing with unlawful software duplication. For example, if classroom sets of pirated software are currently in use, steps should be taken to destroy such copies, and to obtain the software legally. Teachers and students should also be advised that pirated software is illegal and subject to penalty. 

B. Audio Visual Materials 

  1. It is illegal to tape TV programs "

KRENTZMAN-

Math 7-

New Green packet p 24, odds

PreAlg

Blue packet p 12, solve & check

PARTYKA-

Complete handout

Create food Journal (food & liquid consumed today)

Explain the nutrients you are taking in & are they balanced

DARE # 5 assignment due Thursday 3/8

ZANGRILLI

Achieve 3000 – 2 activities, 1 thought question due Thursday 2/8

Quiz – vocabulary Thursday 2/8

Act II quiz Tuesday 3/13

HOGNE (TORGERSEN)

ELA – Finish CW Chap questions

SS – Webquest due Thursday 3/8

RUSSO

MATH – P 12 with check

SCIENCE – quiz Thursday 3/8 on nots covering pp 5 – 14

STAKER

None

 PASSMAN

Elective choice due Thursday 3/8

DARE # 5 assignment due Thursday 3/8

Write down all of the foods your eat today – liquids & solids

MACKIN-

Math - Green packet read p 24 odds, use your class notes

PreAlg-

Blue packet p 12, solve & check

Extra help today, Tuesday 3/6 at recess

POLLACK-

If not done, finish all of “Solving future Problems” days 4 &5 solution planning on Google Classroom

Get test signed

O’CONNOR

None

PASSANANTE-French/Italian/Spanish

Quizzes: Thursday 3/8 2nd group definitions

 Take home quiz due Friday 3rd group definitions on Google Classroom

Flipgrid

ALVES

10 sentences due Thursday 3/8

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